A Man came out of a door in the mountain

In isolated British Columbia, girls, mostly Native, are vanishing from the sides of a notorious highway. Leo Kreutzer and his four friends are barely touched by these disappearances–until a series of mysterious and troublesome outsiders come to town, and it seems as if the devil himself has appeared among them.

In this intoxicatingly lush debut novel, Adrianne Harun weaves together folklore, mythology, and elements of magical realism to create a compelling and unsettling portrait of life in a dead-end town. A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain is atmospheric and evocative, a broken world rendered with grit and poetry in equal measure.

 

 


Praise for A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain

"Let me put it like this: in a just world, A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain would be making headlines. You’d be reading about mammoth advances and film sales and think pieces. In a just world, it would be the big buzz book of the season. Instead, it’s a spectacular read, one you can come to fresh. And come to it you should. No, you must."

Robert Wiersama, Vancover Sun

"A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain proves that Harun is heir apparent to Louise Erdrich and Harry Crews. Her characters shimmer and squirm in liminal spaces, nether regions of geography, race, spirituality and aesthetics. This novel is a mesmerizing incantation, harrowing and hypnotic."

Clare Vaye Watkins, New York Times

"Adrianne Harun's dark, mysterious novel is by turns Gothic and grittily realistic, astute and poetic in its evocation of evil everywhere."

— Andrea Barrett, National Book Award Winner and author of Ship Fever and Servants of the Map

"Harun finds beauty in pitch black; she makes poetry out of brutality and grace out of terror. She is an alchemist, turning the worst aspects of life into gold." 

-- Diana Wagman, author of The Care and Feeding of Exotic Pets and Bump, in the Los Angeles Review of Books

"A Man Came out of a Door in the Mountain is a rich, haunting, original novel that captures evil in many forms--mythic, magic and chillingly real. Adrianne Harun's writing can hold you breathless."

—Jess Walter, author of The Zero and Beautiful Ruins